Two Great ISBA Member Benefits Sponsored by
A Value of $1,344, Included with Membership

Civil Practice And Procedure

The accepted wisdom is that a civil defendant's conviction (e.g., for a traffic offense in a case based on a car wreck) is not a binding admission of wrongdoing — and thus is not admissible in the civil trial — if the defendant merely "stipulated" that the underlying facts are true and did not admit guilt.

But in the August Trial Briefs, Winnebago County Circuit Judge Eugene G. Doherty points to a 35-year-old appellate case, Batterton v. Thurman105 Ill. App. 3d 798434 N.E.2d 1174 (3d Dist. 1982), that indicates otherwise. (Trial Briefs is the newsletter of ISBA's Civil Practice Section.) In Batterton, the court found that the defendant's stipulation to the underlying facts in a criminal proceeding constituted a binding admission and was admissible in the subsequent civil trial.


Perfect your trial practice skills with this full-day seminar that not only walks you through each step of the trial process, but also shows you how technology can help you flawlessly deliver your case to the courtroom. Trial attorneys with intermediate practice experience who attend this seminar in Chicago or via live webcast on May 12, 2017 will learn: how to get rid of biased jurors during voir dire; the importance of a well-told opening statement; how to prepare your next witness for direct examination; how to question lay and expert witnesses during cross examination; which high-tech tools can help you present your next big case; the value of demonstrative exhibits and technology to engage your jury; how to prepare a powerful and persuasive closing argument; what attorneys have done right (and wrong) in trial as experienced by one retired judge; and the common incidents that lead to malpractice.

The program is presented by the ISBA Civil Practice and Procedure Section and qualifies for 7.0 hours MCLE credit, including 7.0 hours Professional Responsibility MCLE credit (subject to approval).

Click here for more information and to register.

Back by popular demand! Lawsuits are often lost or won based on motion practice…so don’t miss this seminar November 11, 2016 that reviews motion practice from the initial filing of the lawsuit through post-trial motions. Attorneys involved in litigation and trial practice with intermediate to advanced levels of experience who attend this seminar will better understand: how to file a motion for change of venue and forum non conveniens; motions to dismiss and summary judgment motions; motions to obtain and preserve evidence, including electronic data; the strategic use of motions in limine before the trial; the requirements for requesting/defending temporary restraining orders and injunctive relief; the post-trial motions appellate issues that counsel wishes you knew; and the recent ethical issues that have confronted the legal profession. The program is available onsite in Chicago or via live webcast.

Update your civil practice knowledge with this top-rated, full-day seminar in Springfield on May 2nd that addresses all phases of the trial—from setting the proper foundation and successfully prosecuting/defending a case, to developing a powerful and effective closing argument! Topics include: filing the lawsuit; pleadings; good faith settlement of claims; motions to dismiss; discovery; requests to admit; Supreme Court Rule 213; motions in limine; closing arguments; post-trial motions; and obtaining circuit court and appellate review of administrative decisions. A discussion on temporary restraining orders and injunctive relief is also included.

The program is presented by the ISBA Civil Practice & Procedure Section and qualifies for 5.5 hours MCLE credit, including 1.0 hour Professional Responsibility MCLE credit (subject to approval).

Click here for more information and to register.