Two Great ISBA Member Benefits Sponsored by
A Value of $1,344, Included with Membership

Elder Law


Are you thinking of expanding your practice to include helping your clients apply for and receive Medicaid benefits to help pay for the cost of long term care? Then you won’t want to miss this nuts-and-bolts seminar in Chicago on October 12, 2017 that teaches you everything you need to know about the Illinois Medicaid rules and procedures. Estate planning practitioners, family law attorneys, elder law lawyers, and new attorneys with basic to intermediate practice experience who attend this seminar will learn: how to represent your clients when it’s time to apply for public benefits; how a homestead or family farm can affect Medicaid eligibility; the concepts and strategies you can use to legally and ethically protect assets while facilitating Medicaid eligibility; how to prepare and submit applications in Decatur and Chicago; how to appeal a denial of benefits; and much more.

It’s that time of year again! Don’t miss ISBA’s third annual elder law bootcamp that offers you the guidance and information you need to effectively represent your aging clients! Attorneys with all levels of practice experience who attend this two-day seminar will gain a better understanding of: Illinois Medicaid eligibility rules; which long-term care planning options are still available; the forms and procedures for filing Medicaid appeals and hardship waivers; how to avoid violating the Illinois Rules of Professional Conduct; how to handle a divorce among your elderly clients, including competency issues, spousal support, and dividing the cemetery plots; the retirement plans and distribution options for the client contemplating retirement; how to detect and prevent investment fraud against your aging client; what to do if your client experiences age discrimination or other employment issues; why mediation is a better alternative to litigation and how to get your client ready; your client’s rights and obligations as a landlord or tenant; how the ABLE Act can help your disabled client; how to handle elder abuse issues – and why self-neglect is on the rise; and much more!

Back by popular demand! Don’t miss ISBA’s second annual elder law bootcamp in Chicago on April 23-April 24, 2015 that offers you the guidance and information you need to effectively represent your aging clients! Attorneys with all levels of practice experience who attend this two-day seminar will gain a better understanding of: how to prevent, prosecute and defend breach of fiduciary duties; the current trends in elder abuse – and why elder abuse and animal cruelty are connected; the most common types of debt facing the elderly; Illinois Medicaid eligibility rules; when to open a probate estate (and when not to); estate planning for the aging client; the differences and similarities between POA’s and Guardianships; current trends in health care fraud; what it takes to become a public guardian; the ethical pitfalls of representing aging clients; Social Security retirement strategies; estate planning for companion pets; the ins and outs of Medicare; the statutes that protect your client’s rights in a nursing home; and how to advise unmarried couples on the various planning options available.

The program is presented by ISBA Elder Law Section and qualifies for 12.50 hours MCLE credit, including 1.0 hour Professional Responsibility MCLE credit (subject to approval).

Click here for more information and to register.

Within the next decade, the aging population will explode due to the wave of baby boomers reaching retirement age, making it imperative that attorneys be prepared to assist and counsel both the elderly client and their children. Don’t miss this first annual elder law bootcamp in Chicago on April 24-25th that offers you the guidance and information you need to effectively represent an aging client! Attorneys with all levels of practice experience who attend this two-day seminar will gain a better understanding of: how to communicate with clients of diminished capacity; how to handle the cognitively impaired attorney; the new Elder Justice Center in Cook County; the alternatives to guardianship; wills vs. trusts; estate planning for families with a special needs member; guardianship litigation; grandparents raising grandchildren; important case law and statutory developments; preventing and prosecuting financial exploitation against elders; Long Term Care and the costs associated with it; and much more!

The program qualifies for 13.25 hours MCLE credit, including 2.5 hours Professional Responsibility MCLE credit (subject to approval).

Click here for more information and to register.

ISBA President Paula H. Holderman discusses the Cook County Court's new Elder Law Division with Judge Patricia Banks, who was recently appointed presiding Judge of the new Elder Law and Miscellaneous Remedies Division.


The Circuit Court of Cook County is proud to announce the opening of The Cook County Elder Justice Center (CCEJC), an innovative elder-friendly facility that is designed to help elderly citizens navigate the Cook County Court system.

The CCEJC is part of the Circuit Court’s Elder Law and Miscellaneous Remedies Division. The CCEJC is conveniently located and easily accessible on the lower level of the Richard J. Daley Center, Room CL-16.

The unique purpose of the CCEJC is to serve as a resource center for citizens of Cook County who are aged 60 and older. The CCEJC will provide information and support needed to help older adults avoid becoming victims of abuse, neglect and financial exploitation. The CCEJC will also provide referrals to the appropriate legal and social service agencies.

  • Opening Date: September 3, 2013
  • Hours: Monday through Friday - 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • Location: 50 West Washington Street, Room CL-16
  • Telephone: (312) 603-9233

The General Assembly is grappling with a $2.7 billion Medicaid funding gap in the as of yet unpublished "SMART" bill. One of the pieces in it may be a reversal of the Medicaid eligibility rules in the compromise last fall between the Department of Healthcare and Family Services' and the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules. An excellent and comprehensive summary of that compromise may be found here in the January 2012 Illinois Bar Journal (by Diana Law and William Siebers). Some of these changes may include the following: (1) A home held in a trust, even an individual’s personal revocable living trust, shall no longer be considered homestead property. (2) People over the age of 65 can no longer participate in a federally created OBRA Pooled Trust. (3) A healthy spouse still living at home will receive only the minimum resource allowance instead of the maximum allowance as previously approved by JCAR. Whatever action the General Assembly may take on this issue will occur in the next ten days, and we'll try to keep you informed to the extent we can.