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Practice News

Chief Judge Stephen J. Culliton announced June 25 that applications for the Office of Associate Judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit of Illinois, DuPage County, have been received from the following people:
  • Terrence J. Benshoof, Glen Ellyn
  • Alan J. Brinkmeier, Elmhurst
  • Brenda M. Carroll, Winfield
  • Anthony V. Coco, Glen Ellyn
  • Kimberly A. Davis, Winfield
  • Robert E. Douglas, Carol Stream
  • Scott M. Hardek, Elmhurst
  • Michael R. Konewko, Winfield
  • Jeffrey N. Kowalkowski, Glen Ellyn
  • Paul A. Marchese, Wheaton
  • Frank J. Markov, Jr., Lombard
  • Sean M. McCumber, Warrenville
  • Robert S. McDonough, Wheaton
  • Ronald D. Menna, Jr., Wheaton
  • Robert A. Miller, West Chicago
  • Michelle L. Moore, Glen Ellyn
  • Michael A. O'Brien, Wheaton
  • James D. Orel, Westmont
  • John J. Pcolinski, Jr., Naperville
  • David E. Schwartz, Glen Ellyn
  • Alfred A. Spitzzeri, Naperville
  • Linda L. Stinauer, Hinsdale
  • Neal F. Thompson, Naperville
The vacancy is the result of the retirement of Associate Judge Kenneth A. Abraham. As part of the review process conducted by the Circuit Judges, Chief Judge Culliton invites public comment by letter before July 6, 2009:

Chief Judge Stephen J. Culliton 18th Judicial Circuit Court 505 N. County Farm Road, Room 2015 Wheaton, IL 60187

In a recent post, Solo in Chicago blawgger Peter Olson interviews fellow Chicagoan Russell Knight about his decision to go solo and the particulars of his practice (how he sets fees, attracts clients, etc.).  A twist on Knight's practice: he's fluent in Spanish.
Jayne Reardon
Jayne Reardon
The Illinois Supreme Court announced today that Jayne Reardon has been appointed as executive director of the Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism, a body established to improve civility between and among lawyers, their clients and judges in Illinois. Ms. Reardon, a University of Michigan Law School graduate who is an experienced Illinois lawyer and licensed to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court, has served as deputy director of the commission since 2006. During that time, she has been a key formulator of policy approved by the Commission and a facilitator of quality continuing legal education in the area of professional responsibility. Supreme Court Justice Robert R. Thomas initiated the concept of the Commission to improve professionalism among lawyers and judges, and the full Supreme Court established the Commission in 2005. The Commission has achieved its goals with limited staff and budget. No taxpayers dollars are involved as the Commission is funded by a small portion of the annual registration and licensing fees paid by Illinois attorneys.
Central Illinois blawgger Jeremy J. Richey conducted a revealing interview with Brian Pedigo, a California lawyer who found himself on a jury and thus saw the sausage being made (indeed, helped make the sausage). Here's a representative quote: "Jurors have their minds made up before they enter the deliberation room, even though they’re not supposed to.  It takes a very persuasive juror to change the mind of another. Also, jurors use common sense almost to a fault.  Sometimes their common-sense opinions are not relevant or related to the actual law." Read the whole interview here. Richey hosts The East Central Illinois Criminal Law & DUI Weblog.
A revised version of the following jury instruction was just posted to the Illinois Supreme Court Web site: "110.04 Liability of Owner or Keeper of a Dog or Other Animal--Statutory Strict Liability."
The Supreme Court ruled today that Texas is entitled to a Voting Rights Act exemption, parents who remove their disabled children from public school can be reimbursed for a private education, and the Army Corps of Engineers can issue permits for dumping dredge into waterways. From On the Docket.
The June issue of the ISBA Workers Compensation newsletter includes an interview by Robert C. Nelson with Springfield arbitrator Ruth White, who remembers her early days as a practitioner. "My first workers' comp trial was a 'nature and extent' only on a back surgery case against the State, " she said. "I tried it all afternoon that day. I remember that when an inexperienced young attorney is going on and on and on." Find out what else she has to say.
Good question, huh? And one for which there's no simple answer. But you'll find useful informed speculation, sample retention policies, relevant ethics opinions and more in the File Retention and Management section of ISBA's Web-based Practice Resource Center. Take a look.